Places

With more than two thousand years of history, Verona is a city that maintains many signs of its past.
Its places, monuments, museums, churches allow to track the stages of its cultural, social and economic evolution.
A place that is almost obligatory to see in the city of the Scaligers is surely the Arena, the imposing Roman amphitheatre located in the animated and lively Piazza Bra.
Other things to admire in the city are the ancient city walls along with Palazzo della Gran Guardia and the 19thcentury town hall, Palazzo Barbieri.
The northern side of the square features the Liston (a wide stone footway that is traditionally used by the people of Verona for relaxing walks) from which it’s possible to reach Via Mazzini, always crowded with shopping enthusiasts. From there, you can reach Via Cappello that according to the legend was the street where Juliet’s house and its famous balcony were located, at house number 23.
The picturesque Piazza Erbe can also be reached from Via Cappello. It contains the market column, the fountain of Madonna Verona and the column of San Marco with on top a lion, the symbol of the Republic of Venice.
From Piazza Erbe, taking Via dalla Costa, you can reach Piazza dei Signori, also known as “Piazza Dante” as it contains a statue dedicated to the father of the Italian language.
Two other statues, dedicated to Scipione Maffei and Girolamo Fracastoro, are also located around the square. The square is enhanced by palaces of great historical and architectural importance, such as Loggia del Consiglio, Palazzo Podestà and the Domus Nova.
The square gives also access to Torre dei Lamberti and is overlooked by Palazzo della Ragione that today hosts the “A. Forti” Modern Art Gallery.
Near the Church of Santa Maria Antica, past the arch between the Palaces of Cangrande and Capitanio, you can visit the Scaliger Tombs (a magnificent funerary building in Gothic style that hosts the tombs of the Lords of Verona).
The itinerary continues towards the Church of Sant’Anastasia, a perfect example of Italian Gothic which contains “St George and the Princess“, a beautiful fresco by Pisanello (1433-38); also in the nearby are Ponte Pietra (the only bridge left from Ancient Rome), the Roman Theatre and the Cathedral.
The tour reaches then Castelvecchio, an imposing castle and symbol of the Scaligers in Verona, built by Cangrande II della Scala in the second half of the 14th century.
The Basilica of S. Zeno, located in the immediate vicinity, is an enchanting example of Romanesque architecture (VIII-IX century). It features a beautiful rose window (called the “Wheel of Fortune”) and contains the renowned triptych by Andrea Mantegna depicting the Madonna and Child with Saints.

Funicular of Castel san Pietro
Funicular of Castel san Pietro

via Fontanelle S. Stefano, 6

For those who would like to admire the city of Verona from a different point of view, the wonderful panoramic terrace of Castel San Pietro is now very near.

The funicular of Verona is near the Roman Theatre, close to the Church of San Stefano.

The funicular already existed during the years before the I° World War: it was meant to help students to reach the Accademia delle Belle Arti, which was once near Castel San Pietro. It also was meant to enhance the beauty of the Hapsburg castle and to make it more accessible to the already numerous tourists.

The funicular was inaugurated in 1941 for the first time, but in was closed in 1944 due to the beginning of the II° World War and consequent economic difficulties. During the 80’ and 90’ there were various proposals concerning its reconstruction and, after the presentation of lots of different projects, it was opened once again in June 2017 as inclined lift.

The funicular runs 159 metres in about 90 seconds, overcoming a vertical distance of 55 metres. So you can easily reach Castel San Pietro and its terrace, enjoying a panoramic view of the city.

Opening hours:

Summer (April – October) 11.00 am – 9.00 pm (last run 8.45 pm)

Winter (November – March) 10.30 am – 4.30 pm

Closed on 25th December and on 1st January.

Tickets:

Normal: € 2,00

Reduced (under 10 and over 65) : € 1,00

Groups ( min 15 people): € 1,50 per pers

The ticket includes ascent and descent : it is not possible to buy them separately.

Contacts:

via Fontanelle S. Stefano, 6

tel. +39 342 896 6695

www.agec.it

Biblioteca Capitolare
Biblioteca Capitolare

Piazza Duomo

The Biblioteca Capitolare of Verona is the most ancient working library in the world.

In this place studied Pipino, Carlo Magno’s son, Dante Alighieri, Francesco Petrarca and many other important historical characters.

This building survived the earthquake, the plague, Napoleon’s robberies, flood in 1882 and bombs and today the library can be defined, as the palaeographer Elias Avery Lowe said, “the queen of the ecclesiastical collections”, with a huge treasure of manuscripts, paintings, incunabula, tools for printing, music instruments and much more.

Info

Piazza Duomo, 13
+39 045 8538071
(0039)388 5758902
info@capitolareverona.it
www.capitolareverona.it

Arena
Arena

Piazza Bra

It is one of the largest amphitheatres in Italy and the most famous monument in Verona. This building was erected by the Romans around the middle of the first century AD and was used to host various types of performances: gladiator battles and fights with ferocious and exotic animals. Its elliptical shape was designed to accommodate a large number of spectators (about 30,000) and to provide enough space for the games. It was built outside the Roman city walls to help the influx of spectators and avoid crowding in the city centre.
The outside
Only the Ala, a short section of the outer ring that was the façade of the Arena, has been preserved. Under the reign of Theodoric (493-526 AD), the outer ring was partially demolished for the construction of a second set of defensive walls, and until the Renaissance the Arena was used as a stone quarry. The façade features just one architectural style, the Tuscan order, with bossages and limestone blocks from Valpolicella.

The inside
It consists of two main parts: the central arena that hosted the shows, and the cavea in different levels for the audience. In ancient times, the seats in the cavea were separated from the arena by a podium which probably had nets to ensure the safety of spectators. Today, the cavea has large reconstructed stone steps but originally it was divided into horizontal sectors through walkways and featured a portico covered with a roof at the top.
The amphitheatre after the Roman age
In the Middle Ages, the outside arches called “arcovoli” were rented out by the Municipality: until the 16th century there were used by prostitutes, but later they became the location of craft shops. Over time, the interior was used for different purposes such as justice administration, parties, shows, races; in 1913 though, Aida by Verdi was staged in the Arena for the first time and since then, the monument has been a venue for summer opera events.

Info
open on Mondays from 1.30pm to 7.30pm
Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30am to 7.30pm
(ticket office closes at 6.30pm)

Tickets

  • full price: € 10,00
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 7,50
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • reduced for residents of the City of Verona: € 1,00
  • combined Museo Museo Maffeiano/full-price Arena: € 11,00 – reduced: € 8,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

Juliet’s House
Juliet’s House

Via Cappello 23

The Juliet’s House Museum is located in a solid mediaeval building which had been perhaps the home of the “Dal Cappello” family since the 13th century. The street was named after them and their emblem is carved in relief in the keystone of the inner arch of the courtyard.
Throughout the centuries, the entire complex underwent numerous restoration and renovation works, and changed hands several times. Meanwhile, the legend and the popular belief that identified it as the birthplace of Juliet Capulet kept growing, and in 1907 the city of Verona considered it appropriate to acquire at least part of the mediaeval complex.

Info
open on Mondays from 1.30pm to 7.30pm
Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30am to 7.30pm
(last admission at 6.45pm)

Tickets

  • full price: € 6,00
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 4,50
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • combined Juliet’s House/Tomb: full price € 7,00 – reduced: € 5,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

Museum of Castelvecchio
Museum of Castelvecchio

The Museum of Castelvecchio hosts important mediaeval, renaissance and modern art collections (up to the 18th century):

  • 29 exhibition halls with paintings, sculptures, artefacts, weapons
  • pieces on display: 622
  • in specialised Cabinets: about 90,000 pieces between coins and medals, 2,650 drawings, 8,000 prints, 800 photographic plates
  • in storage: 2,500 paintings, about 500 sculptures and bronzes, about 800 decorative furniture and artistic pieces, 300 weapons and 200 pieces from the ethnographic collection

In addition to the exhibition halls, the Drawings and Prints Cabinet and the Numismatics Cabinet, the museum includes: management office, administrative and technical offices, general archive, photo library, temporary exhibition room, catalogue store, craft workshops.
The restoration works began at the end of the 1950s and were managed by Licisco Magagnato, director of the Museum, and architect Carlo Scarpa. In close collaboration, they planned a philological restoration of the areas, choosing and placing art pieces that were functionally and emotionally closer to their idea of a museum as a complete artistic creation. Since then, the Museum of Castelvecchio has been a reference point.

Info

open on Mondays from 1.30pm to 7.30pm
Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30am to 7.30pm
(last admission at 6.45pm)

Tickets

  • full-price ticket: € 6,00
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 4,50
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • combined Castelvecchio/Maffeiano: full price € 7,00 – reduced: € 5,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

Museum of Natural History
Museum of Natural History

Lungadige Porta Vittoria 9

Palazzo Pompei, home of the Museum of Natural History of Verona, is one of the most important buildings in Verona from a historical and architectural point of view. It was commissioned by the rich Lavezzola family between 1530 and 1550 to Michele Sanmicheli, an ingenious architect. Later, it became the property of the Pompei family and in 1833 Count Alessandro Pompei donated it to the City of Verona to host exhibitions, art and scientific collections of great prestige and importance for the city. Starting from 1858, the original core of the palace was extended with the progressive annexation of adjacent areas and houses.

Today, the large halls of the palace house sixteen exhibition rooms, the library, workshops, storage rooms for the collection and the offices of the Museum.

The Museum of Natural History of Verona houses various scientific sections dedicated to the study of rocks and minerals, palaeontology and zoology.

The prehistoric and the botanical sections are housed in Palazzina Comando dell’Arsenale Austriaco of Verona.

The scientific material collected by Museum researchers and by many naturalists in almost five centuries, it is now meticulously prepared and catalogued, studied and then archived in the collections or displayed to the public in the halls. Therefore, the Museum plays a central and decisive role in scientific research and in the publication of essays and texts for the popularisation of science.

The educational and communication section is also very active. Its objective is the popularisation of naturalistic culture among the various groups of visitors (schools, adults, families, associations, etc.)

Info
open from Monday to Thursday from 9 am to 5 pm
Saturday and Sunday from 2pm to 6pm
Closed on Fridays

 

 

Info
open from Monday to Thursday from 9 am to 5 pm
Saturday and Sunday from 2pm to 6pm
Closed on Fridays

Tickets

  • full price: € 4,50
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 3,00
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

Centro Internazionale di Fotografia Scavi Scaligeri
Centro Internazionale di Fotografia Scavi Scaligeri

(Italiano) Cortile del Tribunale

From 11 May 2015, the activities of the Centre have been suspended for the necessary adjustments in view of the restoration of Palazzo del Capitanio.

Centro Internazionale di Fotografia Scavi Scaligeri is located in the centre of the City of Verona, very close to two important and large squares: Piazza Erbe and Piazza dei Signori, and close to one of the most important Scaliger monuments, the complex of the Scaliger tombs, the tombs of the Della Scala lords.

The archaeological site was unearthed during an excavation between 1981 and 1983.In 1996, the location was inaugurated as an Exhibition Centre with an exhibition dedicated to American photographers Peter and David Turnley. The exhibition made the area known to the public, and since then it has hosted only photography exhibitions.
The charm of this space and its uniqueness come from the fact that it is a gallery within an archaeological tour.Besides the exhibitions, the Scavi Scaligeri Photography Centre organises several initiatives such as themed workshops, educational tours for adults and children, photography courses, and shows and readings that are always related to the different items on display.

Museo Lapidario Maffeiano
Museo Lapidario Maffeiano

Piazza Bra 28

The Museo Lapidario Maffeiano, erected in the heart of Verona around the middle of the 18th century, is one of the oldest public museums in Europe. Its name is inextricably tied to that of Marquess Scipione Maffei (1675-1755), a scholar and important erudite personality from Verona, renowned and appreciated even abroad for the versatility of his genius and for his numerous interests that he applied to various different fields of knowledge.

The Museum was the result of over thirty years of passionate work by Maffei, during which he collected hundreds and hundreds of inscriptions. He entrusted Alessandro Pompei, an architect and painter from Verona, with the task of constructing a building suitable for their display and preservation, strongly believing that “what is useful to the public must become public domain”.
In this regard, it’s emblematic that Maffei chose this name for his museum: Museum Veronense, that is, the museum of the City of Verona, an actual public institution that, unlike private art collections which were very common at that time, could guarantee the preservation and the safeguard of all exhibits, and avoid their much-feared dispersion, as it often happened instead in the case of items stored in small private museums after the death of their owners.
For more than a century, the Maffeiano would be the most important Museum of Verona and one obligatory stop for the numerous foreign travellers (including J.W. Goethe in September 1786) who, coming from Northern Europe, would come to Italy to do the Grand Tour, a formative trip to have a first-person experience of classical art and culture.

Info
Open Tuesday to Sunday
from 8.30am to 2pm
closed on Mondays

Tickets

  • full price: € 4,50
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 3,00
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • cumulativo Maffeiano/Arena intero: € 11,00 – ridotto: € 8,00

Museo degli Affreschi ‘GB Cavalcaselle’ at Juliet’s tomb
Museo degli Affreschi ‘GB Cavalcaselle’ at Juliet’s tomb

Via Luigi da Porto 5

The ‘Giovanni Battista Cavalcaselle’ Fresco Museum is located on the site of a convent that dates back to the 13th century. The simple Church of San Francesco al Corso was erected in 1230 and, together with the adjacent convent, was home to a community of Conventual Franciscans. When in 1257 the friars moved to a more prestigious church in San Fermo Maggiore, the place was taken over by the sisters of the Monastery of Santa Maria di Zevio. In 1366, the few nuns left adhered to the Benedictine rule, but by 1447 the convent had been abandoned and so, it was dissolved and merged with the Church of Santo Spirito.
It would take one century before another community flourished again within these walls. In 1548, the complex was destined for the accommodation of female converts and spinsters who could no longer stay in the nearby Monastery of Santissima Trinità. These women (ex-prostitutes, miswed, abandoned wives, girls with no dowry) were therefore called Franciscan Nuns. In 1624, lightning struck a nearby gunpowder magazine in Torre della Paglia, along the ancient city walls. The terrible explosion that followed seriously damaged and destroyed many of the surrounding buildings; the church and part of the Convent of San Francesco were rebuilt from foundations in the shape that they still have today.
This century-old story came to a halt at the beginning of the nineteenth century when, following the Napoleonic decrees of the Kingdom of Italy, many monasteries were dissolved and decreed state property. Also the complex of the Franciscan nuns shared this fate and was partly destined for military use, partly for welfare institutions. The subsequent abandonment and the damage caused by bombing during World War II posed a serious threat to its existence. Fortunately, in the 1960s, greater awareness of the importance of preserving cultural heritage led to the restoration of the church and the convent and the decision to use them as museums. The museum, named after Giovanni Battista Cavalcaselle, was inaugurated In 1973.

Giovanni Battista Cavalcaselle (Legnago, Verona, 1819 – Rome 1897) can be considered the father of modern art history in Italy. Even today, his studies on ancient Italian and Flemish painting, written in collaboration with an Englishman named Joseph Archer Crowe, are of fundamental importance. He also actively dealt with issues such as conservation and restoration, museum setup, the cataloguing of art pieces, and the reform of academic teaching, advancing ideas of exemplary concreteness and intelligence.

Info
open on Mondays from 1.30pm to 7.30pm
Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30am to 7.30pm
(last admission at 6.30pm)

Tickets

  • full price: € 4,50
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 3,00
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • combined Juliet’s Tomb/full-price Juliet’s House: € 7,00 – reduced: € 5,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

 

Museo Archeologico al Teatro Romano
Museo Archeologico al Teatro Romano

Piazza Martiri della Libertà

The Museum is located within a convent built in the 15th century by Jesuates who belonged to a congregation founded by Giovanni Colombini from Siena in 1367. The name “Jesuates” originates from their frequent invoking the name of Jesus, whose monogram also appears on some of the doors of the convent.
They were piously devoted to the care of the sick through the production and free distribution of medicines; but they also dealt with the manufacture of perfumes and liquors for sale. A good amount of water was necessary to perform these activities and the Jesuates had found that St Peter Hill was a place rich in this element.

Info
open on Mondays from 1.30pm to 7.30pm
Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30am to 7.30pm
(last admission at 6.30pm)

TIckets

  • full price: € 4,50
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 3,00
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • combined Juliet’s Tomb/full-price Juliet’s House: € 7,00 – reduced: € 5,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

Achille Forti Modern Art Gallery
Achille Forti Modern Art Gallery

Cortile Mercato Vecchio

The new course of the Achille Forti Modern Art Gallery has its own specific mission to return this unique historic, architectural and artistic heritage to the city and to its international audience.

In this regard, it has significant meaning the choice of a crucial area of Verona, the architectural complex of Palazzo della Ragione which contains the most important visual landmarks of the city centre, Torre dei Lamberti and Scala della Ragione, which today, after several restoration campaigns, are accessible again.

As a synthesis of the civic, juridical and artistic pathway that has accompanied the city throughout its evolution from the past to the present, the Palace and the Modern Art Gallery refer to specific peculiarities of the collection model typical of Verona, embodied by Achille Forti and his sense of civil responsibility.

Thanks to the extraordinary nature of the art pieces and a targeted educational, training and communication program,  this new heritage, so well collected, allows the new generations, the citizens and the international public to reconstruct the last two centuries of the visual history of the city in this strikingly beautiful architectural set.

 

Info
open from Tuesday to Friday from 10am to 6pm
Saturday, Sunday and holidays from 11am to 7pm
(last admission is 45 minutes before closing)
closed on Mondays

 

Tickets

  • combined Gallery + full-price Torre dei Lamberti: € 8,00; reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 5,00; reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00; free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass
  • Gallery only: full-price ticket: € 4,00; reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 2,50; schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – teachers accompanying school groups (two per class regardless of the number of students) with VeronaCard pass

Torre dei Lamberti
Torre dei Lamberti

(Italiano) Via della Costa, 2

 

The Medieval Tower was began in the XII Century, and on several occasions raised. You can note it nowadays by the different materials used, as tuff brick and marble. The restoration lasted until 1464, and the large clock was added later, in 1779.

It is the highest tower of Verona, 84 meters, and we don’t know who proyected and restored it. It raises near of the “Palazzo della Ragione”, an ancient centre of the free municipality and dominates “Piazza Erbe”, which was the ancient Roman Foro. You can reach the summit with the stairs or for the laziest, a convenient elevator.

On the tower were placed two bells, the smallest served to mark the hours, and in order to indicate the fire. The biggest one to gather the Town Council and call the citizens to the arms in order to defend the city.

Info
open from Monday to Friday from 10am to 6pm
Saturday, Sunday and holidays from 11am to 7pm
(last admission is 45 minutes before closing)

Tickets

  • full price: € 8,00
  • reduced for groups, senior citizens (over 60) and students: € 5,00
  • reduced for schools/children 8-14 years (only if accompanied): € 1,00
  • free admission: senior residents of the City of Verona (over 65) – disabled people and their carers – children up to 7 years of age – with VeronaCard pass

The ticket includes entry to the Achille Forti Modern Art Gallery at Palazzo della Ragione.

Scaliger Tombs
Scaliger Tombs

Via Santa Maria Antica 4

The Scaliger Tombs of Verona are a monumental funerary complex in Gothic style, erected by the Scaliger family to contain the arks (tombs) of the most distinguished representatives of their house.

The tombs are enclosed by a wrought iron fence with a stairs motif, the symbol of the family, while the sarcophagi are positioned on the ground or on raised surfaces. The arks are:

  • the ark of Cangrande I Della Scala, placed above the portal of the church, was the first of the tombs to be built in the 14th century by will of the deceased. It was designed by the same architect of the Church of S. Anastasia who designed a Gothic tabernacle supported by dogs in solemn barding; on the lid lies the statue of the deceased, while the sides are adorned with depictions of religious themes in high relief and military bas-reliefs. On top of the baldachin is a replica of the equestrian statue of Cangrande I. Since 1921, the original has been kept at the Museum of Castelvecchio along with his grave goods
  • the construction of the ark of Mastino II began in 1345 and its design underwent numerous changes over the years: originally, it was painted and gilded, enclosed by a railing with four statues of the Virtues at its corners. The sides of the ark are adorned with religious motifs while a statue of Mastino II lies on the lid, watched over by two angels. The baldachin has trilobate arches and features religious high-reliefs on the front, counterpoised by the equestrian statue of Mastino II, currently replaced by a copy while the original was recently moved to the clock tower of Castelvecchio.
  • the ark of Cansignorio dates back to 1375 and is the most richly decorated. The sculptures, designed by Bonino da Campione, depict holy warriors, characters from the Gospels, Virtues and Apostles, plus the large equestrian statue of Cansignorio
  • the richly sculpted sarcophagus of Alberto I, made in 1301
  • the hanging ark of Giovanni della Scala

Tickets

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